A Call To Teach

They set up classrooms in malls,
call them “alternative”, cater to
those who have fallen through
proverbial cracks, teens unfit
for institutional learning…

I was wayward once, could not
value education while teenage
angst pushed me overboard –
home life too quixotic for
reasonable expectations of
comportment …

My heart reaches out
to those displaced, for whom
common curriculum does not gel –
I long to meet with them on concrete
benches, over cups of Tim Horton’s
lending a sympathetic ear…

School is not the defining moment
the last stop before our final destination;
it is a stepping stone, one of many paths
that lead to discovery, to definition,
troubled souls crave soothing…

maybe, if I could light a torch
for just one child, build a bridge
of hope, the girl in me would be
quieted, reassured, healed –
validation ensuring a future for all.

(Image: classroom.synonym.com)

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9 comments

  1. I was never the happy student in that environment and having undiagnosed ADD didn’t help. I myself went to an alternative school after punching the star QB g/f out. (unhappy residue of rigid environments) and enjoyed many aspects of it. Teaching how to care is the hardest thing to teach which goes beyond the way of rigid structures and formula. That’s math in simplistic terms rather than the vibrant, learning hub that keeps us all thriving together in teachability.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Love it – you sound like a woman of my own heart. I had attitude. Didn’t attend classes. I became a teacher because I wanted to make a difference for kids like myself. And then I got sick and had to give up – really miss my kids. I ran into one recently, who gave me a big hug – like many, he is on his feet and productive now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah I liked to skip school and smoke in the bathroom haha. It is amazing to me that those who didn’t even like school could go back to become teachers. It impresses me that you did before life gave you a new assignment 🙂 We always remember our teachers and I had many great ones. The first day of that school I had a book thrown at me (the teacher was aiming for someone else). They are the ones that got us through. Because of that, I was able to stand strong and battle my son (also with adhd) stay in school until he graduated. Many people just do not understand the challenges.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I went back after I raised my children – and you are right, many of my colleagues were good students, loved school – they didn’t get the kids that acted out. I was there for them, and they knew it. Several said to me: “Mrs K, you were a bad kid once, weren’t you?” I guess you never lose it, ha ha.

        Liked by 1 person

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